Off To Never Land....

Think of a wonderful thought....
the Dapper Dans, churros, fresh hot popcorn, the Flag Retreat Ceremony, the wildest ride in the wilderness, sitting at the Hungry Bear waving at passerbys on the Mark Twain, the brakes needing a little work, the room actually stretching, nightly fireworks, the Frontierland music loop, Shrunken Ned, Dole Whips, Scot Bruce rocking and rolling at the Tomorrowland Terrace, and on and on....all of the wonderful things Disneyland contains that remind me of never growing up.

"To all who come to this happy place, welcome."

With those words, Walt Disney opened the gates to his dream, Disneyland, on July 17, 1955 — 59 years ago Thursday.

Quite a milestone when you think that many predicted the theme park wouldn’t survive its first year.


• Disneyland’s 1 millionth guest arrived Sept. 8, 1955, less than two months after opening day.

• The 5 millionth guest arrived Oct. 4, 1956.

• The 10 millionth guest arrived Dec. 31, 1957.

• The 100 millionth guest arrived June 17, 1971.

• The 500 millionth guest was welcomed Jan. 8, 2004.

It is possible that the total attendance for both parks will hit 750 million guests sometime during the Diamond Celebration in 2015.

Vintage Disneyland

(Per Request)

Some Disneyland before & after photos….

Happy 59th Birthday Disneyland!!!

In the pre-show area of Muppet Vision 3-D in Disney’s California Adventure Park, if you look up high you’ll see some bombs hanging from the ceiling. Adjacent to the bombs, you’ll see patriotic soldiers and a colorful cannon on top of the catwalk. Those soldiers were actually used in the filming of the grand finale of the Muppet Vision movie.

(This post is per request).

In the early days of Disney’s California Adventure park, the entrance music loop featured the following songs:
-San Fernando Valley by Bing Crosby
-Hooray for Hollywood 
-California Dreamin’ by The Mamas & the Papas
-I Love LA by Randy Newman
-California, Here I Come by Al Jolson
-California Girls by the Beach Boys
-Little Old Lady from Pasadena by Jan & Dean
-Do You Know the Way to San Jose by Dionne Warwick
-Hollywood Nights by Bob Seger
-San Francisco Bay Blues by Peter, Paul & Mary
-Avalon by Natalie Cole
-Route 66 by Nat King Cole
-If You’re Going to San Francisco by Scott McKenzie
-26 Miles by The Four Preps
-Surf City by Jan & Dean
-Surfin’ USA by the Beach Boys

(This post is per request).

In the early days of Disney’s California Adventure park, the entrance music loop featured the following songs:
-San Fernando Valley by Bing Crosby
-Hooray for Hollywood
-California Dreamin’ by The Mamas & the Papas
-I Love LA by Randy Newman
-California, Here I Come by Al Jolson
-California Girls by the Beach Boys
-Little Old Lady from Pasadena by Jan & Dean
-Do You Know the Way to San Jose by Dionne Warwick
-Hollywood Nights by Bob Seger
-San Francisco Bay Blues by Peter, Paul & Mary
-Avalon by Natalie Cole
-Route 66 by Nat King Cole
-If You’re Going to San Francisco by Scott McKenzie
-26 Miles by The Four Preps
-Surf City by Jan & Dean
-Surfin’ USA by the Beach Boys

Step inside the Opera House at Town Square, Main Street, U.S.A. and peruse a vast collection of artifacts and memorabilia showcasing the development of Disneyland Park through the years.
Take a close look at a particular bit of Disneyland’s legacy - the collection of park tickets.
There’s a very large bulletproof case containing countless tickets, including ride ticket books and admission passes. But there’s one particular slip of paper that makes this exhibit particularly interesting.
(It’s the greenish one at the top left of the picture).
That ticket was one of the very first Disneyland tickets ever made. It was donated to the park by someone who was personally invited to attend opening day. So, how much is that ticket worth? Well, let’s just say that the case housing the ticket collection was recently insured for over $22,000,000.

Gone, but not forgotten….

The Burning Settler’s Cabin
It was a moonshiner’s cabin set ablaze, apparently by hostile Indians, complete with a dead settler outside. His body was even pierced with an exaggeratedly large arrow, visible to patrons of the train and boat rides.
Who was this settler, and why was he attacked by the “Unfriendly Indians”? Well, it’s actually a full-body fiberglass cast of former Imagineer Ed Winger. Winger’s name can be seen on one of the windows above the Carnation Cafe on Main Street. Appropriately, the window is captioned, “Old Settler’s Gold Dredging”, listing Ed Winger as the proprietor.
In 1984, the scenario was altered to be a little more racially sensitive, and the explanation for the fire was that the moonshine still had caught fire. The arrow was removed and the settler was still lying there, presumably asleep after having too much to drink.
Around 1991, the flames ceased to burn, and the settler was removed entirely. A hollow, charred cabin stood for many years.
Recently however, the entire area has been cleaned up, with many additions such as a fire pit, a stable, and a tree house. A sign in front proclaims that the land is now the home of “Mike Fink: King of the River”.

America on Parade was a temporary replacement for Disneyland’s and the Magic Kingdom’s Main Street Electrical Parade for the United States Bicentennial.

Like the Main Street Electrical Parade it was also created under the direction of Disneyland’s Director of Entertainment, Bob Jani. The parade float units were designed by New York theatrical designer Peter Larkin. The first run was in the summer of 1975 and was originally designed to run through 1977, to commemorate the United States Bicentennial.

Where the Main Street Electrical Parade ran twice nightly, America On Parade ran once during the afternoon and again just prior to the nightly fireworks display. It traveled the full length of Disneyland from “it’s a small world” to Town Square at the beginning of Main Street, U.S.A.

The giant X-Wing replica from Star Wars, which once hung high above the Starcade, now lives inside Tomorrowland’s Star Trader store. Take a closer look at the prop to notice the small messages printed along the body. Those characters are Aurebesh, a written language from Star Wars.

So what do they say?
Picture 1:
“THE CHESHIRE CAT”
“THE MAD HATTER”
Picture 2: “
“SNOW WHITE”
“PETER PAN”
“CAPTAIN HOOK”